Our Blogs‎ > ‎

Sustainable Schools Blog



The Sustainable Schools program
 helps students of all ages protect our ecosystem and live sustainably. We provide hands-on education on waste prevention, water conservation, energy efficiency and climate change for all grade levels. Read more.

Material World workshop teaches middle schoolers about consumerism

posted Feb 14, 2017, 12:33 PM by Hannah Coughlin   [ updated Feb 15, 2017, 12:57 PM by Virginia Cleaveland ]

By Priscilla Brotherton, Sustainable Schools Education Specialist

For the first Material World workshop in our Waste Prevention and Water Conservation programs for middle and high school students, my goal was to teach two classes of 7th graders how their actions have an effect on our world as a whole.

No small task.

We started with the big picture. While seated on the floor in a circle, students were told that the pile of chips in the middle of the circle were for all of us. At the beginning of a round, every student had a chance to take resources from the pile. At the end of the round, I would double whatever was left in the pile, and anyone who had 10 or more chips would get a reward. (In this case, the teacher provided the incentive — their school's "Economy Bucks.") The pile could never be any bigger than what it was at the beginning — our pile was at maximum capacity. And they weren’t allowed to communicate once questions were answered.

What ensued was chaos. Some students dove into the middle to get to the pile first. The round was over before you knew it. Only one or two students got the reward. But, sadly, there was nothing left in the pile. So, nothing could be doubled and the game was over.

“Would you like to try again?” I asked.

As you can imagine, the next couple attempts were equally beneficial to some and frustrating to others. The realization that the pool wouldn’t be doubled had some students trying to police the pool and others begging to be able to speak.

“Would you like to try speaking?” I asked.

To their relief, they had no restraint in sharing their ideas. The cries of unfairness from those who got none were equal to the looks of regret from those who took plenty. Eventually they formed a “civil society,” agreeing upon a way to play the “game” so that everyone was rewarded.

The discussion this simulation offers is rich. When asked to draw parallels between the way the chips were treated and the way individuals, and society as a whole, use or overuse renewable resources, the connection was quickly made to deforestation, overfishing, pollution, and more. And when asked to view each individual as a country, the benefit of communication was undeniable.

This simulation is a pre-lesson to a two-part workshop on consumerism. 

Part two started with a "What do you remember?" question. The responses were happily right on target with my goals. Students remembered that if we deplete or are greedy with our resources, no one wins.

With that reflection, the lesson began with a graphic that illustrates how the United States has only 5% of the world’s population, yet we consume 25% of its natural resources. We are the person in the circle who is selfishly taking more than our share. Why? How?

We spent the next hour trying to answer those questions and offer some solutions. Students were taken through a brief synopsis of how the garment industry has an impact on our world, through unseen environmental and human costs. Students made difficult decisions on how packaging — an unseen environmental cost — is complicated. They defended their choices and were allowed to change their minds when the situation called for it.

The realization that reducing personal consumption habits is beneficial, but engaging students to take a look at their own purchases in a wants-versus-needs personal inventory is truly eye-opening. Many were surprised that they, in fact, didn’t even know how many of a certain item they owned. They were equally dumbfounded when asked what natural resources were used to make the products. After planting the seeds of awareness of personal contributions to the problem, we moved into solutions.

The creative juices flowed when students were offered different items that would normally head to the landfill, and asked to come up with new uses for each. Examples of repurposed or upcycled products were oohed and aaahed over. To help close the loop, we closed with  a discussion around where, locally, consumers can purchase and recycle used items.

During the final visit, students will participate in a repurposing or upcycling project, teaching them how to take real action on the concept of consumerism.

Beach Clean Up at Semiahmoo Spit: Stand for the Salish Sea

posted Feb 2, 2017, 4:32 PM by RE Sources for Sustainable Communities   [ updated Feb 2, 2017, 4:40 PM ]

By Sarah Sasek
Coordinator of Students for the Salish Sea

On Monday 16th, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, 40+ volunteers gathered to pick up litter from Semiahmoo Spit. The weather was clear and warm for the beach clean up, organized by RE Sources and WWU’s student club, Students for The Salish Sea. As we walked along the beach, we could see the city of White Rock, BC approximately four miles to the northeast of the tip of the spit. 

The clean up was organized in solidarity with Friends of the San Juans, a grassroots conservation organization, who coordinated similar clean ups on San Juan, Lopez, Shaw, and Orcas Islands to show that the Islanders oppose the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which, if built, would increase tanker traffic transporting crude oil in BC waters sevenfold. Looking out into Semiahmoo Bay and the Straight of Georgia, we all felt a collective need to speak up for the voiceless; for the water, the orcas, and the salmon of The Salish Sea.

https://www.facebook.com/trisha.patterson.9/posts/1292980797424940
Semiahmoo Resort graciously allowed us to dump the litter gathered on the spit in their receptacles, and even volunteered two workers, a jackhammer, and a flat bed to help us haul away the concrete and styrofoam from the dock that had washed up on Semiahmoo Bay. Thanks again to everyone who showed up to Stand for The Salish Sea. 





Green Classroom Accomplishments 2016-2017

posted Jan 9, 2017, 12:15 PM by RE Sources for Sustainable Communities   [ updated Mar 21, 2017, 2:21 PM by RE Sources Education ]

Congratulations to the following classrooms who have received their Green Classroom Certification in 2016-2017! See what amazing things these classes have accomplished below. This blog post will be updated throughout the year as new classrooms complete their certification.


Kindergarten

“We pledge to dry our hands-on towel, use scrap paper, recycle paper and teach our families about recycling”
Laura Boynton’s kindergarten classroom did the waste prevention program and learned about the harmful impacts littering and landfills have on the environment. They sorted through trash with Ricky the Raccoon and put the waste in the correct bins. For their action project, the classroom conducted a litter clean up around their school.

“We pledge to bring reusable materials into class for crafts.”

Teresa Udo’s kindergarten classroom (left) did the waste prevention program and learned about the harmful impacts littering and landfills have on the environment. They sorted through trash with Ricky the Raccoon and put the waste in the correct bins. For their action project, the classroom conducted a litter clean up around their school.







First Grade











“We pledge to put all our scrap paper in the recycle bin.” 
Marla Reimer’s 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary (left) completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing different ways to reduce our waste, like reducing the amount of garbage we make in the first place, the students performed a litter clean up around their school. The students learned how harmful litter can be to the animals and the surrounding environment.



“We pledge to reuse, reduce and recycle.”
Susan Kelley’s 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary (left) completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing the harmful impacts of litter on our environment and different ways to reduce our waste, like, reducing the amount of garbage we make in the first place, the students performed a litter clean up, picking up trash around their school.

“We pledge to recycle all of our paper” 
Emily Hie’s 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing the harmful impacts of litter on our environment, and different ways to reduce our waste, the students performed a litter clean up, picking up trash around their school.


Second Grade

“We pledge to turn down the heat and wear more coats.”
Kirsten Zoba's 2nd grade class at Cascadia Elementary completed the Energy Efficiency and Climate Change program. The students made energy bursts reminder pledges to take home to remind their families how to save energy.

“We pledge to turn off the lights when we leave the classroom.”
Kerry Brehan's 2nd grade class at Cascadia Elementary completed the Energy Efficiency and Climate Change program. The students made energy bursts reminder pledges to take home to remind their families how to save energy.

“We pledge to turn off the lights every time we leave the classroom.”
Diane Dodd's 2nd grade class at Cascadia Elementary completed the Energy Efficiency and Climate Change program. The students made energy bursts reminder pledges to take home to remind their families how to save energy.

“We pledge to REUSE both sides of paper before reycling it.”
Becky Pederson’s 2nd classroom completed the waste prevention program where they learned about how they can send less waste to landfills. For their action project, the students made paper from recycled paper!

“We pledge to Recycle classroom garbage.”
Kathryn Otten’s 2nd classroom completed the waste prevention program where they learned about how they can send less waste to landfills. For their action project, the students made paper from recycled paper.

“We pledge to reuse paper. “
KC Rhodes’ 2nd classroom completed the waste prevention program where they learned about how they can send less waste to landfills. For their action project, the students made paper from recycled paper.

“We pledge to compost our paper towels.”
Scarlett Ballard’s 2nd grade classroom completed the waste prevention program where the students learned about how they can send less waste to landfills. For their action project, the students made paper from recycled paper.

“We pledge to not waste water at home and at school.”

Annie Welch’s 2nd grade classroom (left) completed the water conservation program. The students learned about why it is important to conserve water and how harmful litter and pollutants can be on the wildlife and ecosystems. For their action project, the students created educational posters to inform other students about water conservation.


“We pledge to use scrap paper instead of new paper whenever we can.”

Morgan Clark’s 2nd grade classroom (left) completed the waste prevention program. The students learned about landfills and why we all need to reduce, reuse and recycle more. For their action project, the students performed a litter clean up around their school.



“We pledge to turn off the lights when we leave the room and keep the classroom at 67 F or lower to save energy.”
Bethany Buroff’s 2nd grade classroom completed the energy efficiency program. The students learned about renewable vs. non-renewable energy sources and what is considered “clean” energy and what is considered “dirty” energy. They played a memory game, and created energy burst take home pledges for their action project to remind themselves and family how to save energy at home.



Third Grade

“We pledge to use the sun's heat to warm our classroom.” 

Liane Koester’s 3rd grade classroom (left) completed the Energy Efficiency and Climate Change program. After engaging in a conversation about Energy efficient cars and learning about clean and dirty energy sources, the students created energy burst reminder pledges for take home. 




“Make educational posters and perform water audit with pre and post survey of which class refill their water bottles the most.” 
Marca Kidwell-Babcock’s two 3rd grade classroom completed the Water Conservation program. Both classrooms learned about actions that waste and save water. Her two classrooms made educational posters to put up around the school and performed water audits seeing which classrooms in the school refilled their water bottles the most. 



“We pledge to turn of the water while washing our hands and pick up litter when we see it.”

Isabel Machuca-Kelley’s 3rd grade classroom (above) completed the Water Conservation Program. After learning about ways to save water and what makes the water polluted, the class decided to pick up garbage. Three 3rd grade classrooms did a collaborative litter clean and picked up trash around their school!

“We pledge to bring our water bottles to school so we don’t waste water at the drinking fountain between sips.”
Rachel Frere’s 3rd grade classroom (above) completed the Water Conservation Program. After learning about ways to save water and what makes the water polluted, the class decided to pick up garbage. Three 3rd grade classrooms did a collaborative litter clean and picked up trash around their school!

“We pledge to turn off the water while lathering our hands when washing.”
Mimi Saunders’s 3rd grade classroom (above) completed the Water Conservation Program. After learning about ways to save water and what makes the water polluted, the class decided to pick up garbage. Three 3rd grade classrooms did a collaborative litter clean and picked up trash around their school!

“We pledge to use only 2 clicks of paper towels and to think about our compost and garbage before we leave our lunchroom seat.”

Jamie Kamrath’s 3rd grade classroom completed the waste prevention program. The students learned about how they can send less waste to landfills by recycling, reusing, reducing, and composting. The students made educational posters to go up around the school to educate others about making less waste!

“We pledge to use 2 clicks of paper towels at the restroom. We will sort our compost at lunch without help.”
Robb McKay 3rd grade classroom completed the waste prevention program. The students learned about how they can send less waste to landfills by recycling, reusing, reducing, and composting. The students made educational posters to go up around the school to educate others about making less waste!

“We pledge to use only 2 clicks of paper towels dispensers in our school.”
Amber Brouillette’s 3rd grade classroom completed the waste prevention program. The students learned about how they can send less waste to landfills by recycling, reusing, reducing, and composting. The students made educational posters to go up around the school to educate others about making less waste!

“We pledge to use only 2-3 clicks of paper towels and think before you dump your food, about what can be composted.”
Ricki Moynihan-Downs 3rd grade classroom completed the waste prevention program. The students learned about how they can send less waste to landfills by recycling, reusing, reducing, and composting. The students made educational posters to go up around the school to educate others about making less waste!


About Green Classrooms

Our free Green Classrooms program helps teachers integrate conservation education into curriculum and initiate positive action in the classroom. Through workshops, pledges, and action projects we challenge students to think critically about their use of natural resources and see how waste, water, and energy are integral parts of our everyday lives. Hands-on activities and projects provide them the opportunity to brainstorm solutions and take action to promote conservation.

AmeriCorps Story of Service: Helping students turn the topic of energy efficiency into a real-life learning opportunity

posted Dec 21, 2016, 10:50 AM by RE Sources for Sustainable Communities   [ updated Feb 2, 2017, 4:18 PM ]

By Lindsey Gard, Green Classroom Coordinator, AmeriCorps

The next generation of scientists, engineers and energy users are in school every day, learning reading, writing and math. What about teaching the children of our community where the energy comes from to turn on their bedroom light? And what the consequences of that energy use might be? 

My name is Lindsey and I am a Washington Service Corps/AmeriCorps member serving at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities, where I teach elementary-aged children about water conservation, waste reduction, energy efficiency, and climate change through workshops and action projects through our Green Classroom program. 
























Recently, I hosted an hourlong workshop on Energy Efficiency and Climate Change in a third grade class at Lowell Elementary. Though I probably brought up topics a little too advanced for them — carbon producers, carbon consumers, renewable energy, nonrenewable energy, dirty and clean energy, and greenhouse gases — the kids were super engaged with the presentation. 

One student compared clean energy to electric cars and said they do not put any pollutants into the air. Another student added that unless you bought a Tesla car, electric cars are hybrids and those cars do put pollutants into the air. Even though I was in the classroom talking about this big picture of energy efficiency, these students were able to make a connection to a real scenario that impacts their daily lives. 

Talking about dirty energy sources like coal, crude oil, and gas and clean energy sources like wind and solar opened up the platform for these kids to engage in a conversation about sustainable sources of energy, and in particular, sustainable transportation. I was so proud in this moment, because I realized the students were carrying on the conversation without me. They were knowledgeable and excited to talk about electric cars, and the impacts they have on our air quality. 

Serving for teachers and students in my community and teaching them about water conservation, energy conservation, and waste reduction, makes me feel hopeful about our future generations.

I am hopeful that some of these kids will go home and talk to their parents and guardians about turning off the lights when they're not in use. I am hopeful the students will think about how they shouldn’t leave the faucet running when washing their hands so they can conserve water, even the smallest bit. I am hopeful that when they go to the grocery store with their family, they will say it is better to buy something with less packaging to reduce waste. 

I am hopeful the facts I relay to students about conservation and sustainability translate into real-life moments in their lives — even if just for a moment, a day, or throughout the whole year.

About the Green Classroom program

The Green Classroom program for elementary school students is a free program that provides teachers with a meaningful, simple way to integrate conservation education into their curriculum and initiate sustainable changes in the classrooms and beyond. Through workshops, pledges, and action projects we challenge students to think critically about their use of natural resources while providing them the opportunity to brainstorm solutions and take action to promote conservation.

Young Water Stewards teaches Ferndale, Lynden high school students about their local watersheds

posted Dec 12, 2016, 5:52 PM by RE Sources for Sustainable Communities   [ updated Feb 2, 2017, 4:07 PM ]

The Sustainable Schools and Clean Water programs at RE Sources for Sustainable Communities joined forces this fall to launch Young Water Stewards for high school students in rural Whatcom County, helping them develop an understanding of their local watersheds and how to be a steward of clean water. 

A watershed is a drainage basin that funnels water into a lake, river, or bay. Everyone lives in a watershed, which means our choices impact the health of our waters.

This fall, 175 high school students from Lynden and Ferndale participated in the Young Water Stewards training. Students learned how watersheds function through an interactive watershed model, learned how to conduct water quality testing, toured their local watershed to learn about different types of pollution, learned tips for how to protect the health of their local watershed, and took part in a stewardship project.

Field notes

After getting their hands dirty with the interactive watershed model, students boarded a bus for a comprehensive tour of their local watershed. Both the Fishtrap Creek and Schell Creek watersheds in Lynden and Ferndale, respectively, have been identified by Whatcom County as having high levels of pollution, making them the perfect case studies for these Young Water Stewards.

“We must keep the watershed protected and clean for everything to survive.” (Kiera, Ferndale High School)

As the bus trundled along, students learned how rainwater can carry different types of pollution into nearby lakes, rivers, and bays. Stops at several bridges helped students gain a unique perspective on how pollution from residential and industrial areas can impact water quality, and how bacteria from pet waste and farm fields can run off into waterways. 

An extended creekside stop taught students how to use scientific tools and measurements to analyze water samples, exposing new scientific concepts for watershed health, including dissolved oxygen, turbidity, temperature, and pH.

“I like how we learned so many different things, like riparian buffers or dissolved oxygen, yet it all ties in together.” (Lauren, Ferndale High School)

The watershed tours and water quality sampling exercises provided a unique opportunity to make abstract ideas become more concrete, challenging students to think about the health of their local watershed and how different types of land use — from cities to farms to neighborhoods — can impact watershed health.

“It’s interesting to see how pollution can affect aquatic life.” (Student, Lynden High School)

After returning to school, the students took their new knowledge and discussed the importance of individual and community stewardship actions to keep their watershed healthy. The students brainstormed stewardship projects to help improve their local watershed. Since their high school is also within their local watershed, they didn’t have to go very far to make a difference.

Spirits were high as students spent their afternoon outside in the sun, where they pulled invasive blackberry bushes and competed in litter cleanups. Students said they felt like they really accomplished something, whether it was clearing invasive plants from the creek on school property, or picking up more than 100 pounds of trash.

Getting involved in a stewardship project helped the students see firsthand how every person can take action to keep their local watershed clean.

“When we did the stewardship project, it made me feel like we did something good for the school.” (Oliver, Ferndale High School)

According to student surveys, after participating in Young Water Stewards, nearly every student built some new knowledge of their local watershed, how it works, and why it’s important. Almost three-quarters of students said they enjoyed the project, and almost half said they have an increased or continued interest in pursuing a science-based career. For teenagers, we think these numbers are fantastic and feel lucky to have spent this fall with the students of Lynden and Ferndale.

More information

Young Water Stewards meets Next Generation Science Standards and includes in-class lessons, a field trip around your high school’s local watershed, water quality sampling, and a culminating stewardship project. The program lasts one week and includes up to 20 hours of direct instruction.

The program hopes to extend to Meridian, Blaine, Mt. Baker, and Nooksack Valley high schools in 2017.

Teachers interested in enrolling in the program, and volunteers interested in chaperoning a field trip or supporting the program, can email schools@re-sources.org or call 360-733-8307 x210.

The program is funded by a grant from NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

For more information about the Young Water Stewards program, visit re-sources.org/programs/sustainableschools/waterstewards.

Waste Rangers keep streets clean after race

posted Dec 5, 2016, 4:42 PM by RE Sources for Sustainable Communities   [ updated Dec 5, 2016, 4:44 PM ]

By Riley Grant, Sustainable Schools Program Manager

As the final racers crossed the finish line, I met with local Jr. Girl Scout troop members to survey the area around the Depot Market Square. Our challenge was to clean up the litter left behind by the earlier crowd. 

The Jr. Girl Scouts were one of the first groups to participate in RE Sources Sustainable Schools new Waste Rangers program, a service-learning program focused on working with youth organizations to raise awareness about solid waste issues in Whatcom County and engage youth in projects to address these issues. 

Through the litter clean-up following the marathon, the Jr. Girl Scouts learned about some of the issues litter causes in our community, like marine debris caused from litter washing into storm drains on rainy days, or wildlife accidentally eating the litter and getting sick.

The girls also learned that a large majority of litter is created inadvertently by people — whether it's forgetting and walking away from your coffee cup, or accidentally dropping something from your pocket while you're getting your phone out, or the wind blowing waste from recycle bins — everyone accidentally creates litter at some point. Our new Waste Rangers are learning that solid waste issues such as litter is everyone's responsibility to address, and working collectively we can make an impact.

The three Jr. Girl Scouts, their parent chaperones and one four-year-old "Girl Scout in training" were able to collect 10 pounds of litter from the area around the finish line, even after volunteer crews did the majority of the post-race clean up. 

When asked what they learned and what they liked, the newly anointed Waste Rangers said they learned that a lot of garbage ends up as litter and they liked that they were able to make a difference and help their community. Even the "Girl Scout in training" said that her favorite thing was helping the big girls find the litter — another Waste Ranger in the making!

Green Classroom Accomplishments 2015-2016

posted Dec 5, 2016, 3:26 PM by RE Sources for Sustainable Communities   [ updated Dec 5, 2016, 3:33 PM ]

Congratulations to the following classrooms who attained their Green Classroom Certification in 2015-2016! See what amazing things these classes have accomplished below.

Our free Green Classroom program helps teachers integrate conservation education into curriculum and initiate positive action in the classroom. Through workshops, pledges, and action projects we challenge students to think critically about their use of natural resources and see how waste, water, and energy are integral parts of our everyday lives. Hands-on activities and projects provide them the opportunity to brainstorm solutions and take action to promote conservation.


Kindergarten

"We pledge to pick up litter and dispose of it correctly when we can."
Karen Teshera's kindergarten class at Skyline Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing the impacts that litter can have on the environment and discovering alternative waste management strategies like recycling, students were excited to host a litter cleanup around their school grounds. In 30 minutes we collected almost 15 pounds of litter, making the school grounds and cleaner and healthier place for everyone to enjoy.

"We pledge to pick up litter and dispose of it correctly when we can."
John Yost's kindergarten class at Skyline Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project.
After discussing the impacts that litter can have on the environment and discovering alternative waste management strategies like recycling, students were excited to host a litter cleanup around their school grounds. In 30 minutes we collected almost 15 pounds of litter, making the school grounds and cleaner and healthier place for everyone to enjoy.

"We pledge to pick up litter and dispose of it correctly when we can."
Sabrina Hauk's kindergarten class at Skyline Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing the impacts that litter can have on the environment and discovering alternative waste management strategies like recycling, students were excited to host a litter cleanup around their school grounds. In 30 minutes we collected almost 15 pounds of litter, making the school grounds and cleaner and healthier place for everyone to enjoy.


1st Grade

"We pledge to keep our sink off when we aren't using it."
Kelly Morgan's 1st grade class at Birchwood Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets that we displayed during their open house (see photo below) before sending them home to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation.

"We pledge to bring a reusable cup or water bottle to get drinks while at school."
Valerie Smith's 1st grade class at Birchwood Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation.

"We pledge to pick up litter when we see it and dispose of it correctly."
Valerie Smith's 1st grade class at Birchwood Elementary ALSO completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing the impacts that litter can have on the environment and discovering alternative waste management strategies like recycling, students were excited to host a litter cleanup on Earth Day. They conducted a litter cleanup at Little Squalicum Beach. Over 40 pounds of trash was collected with help from the Bellingham Kiwanis Club and Congressman Rick Larsen - they even made the news! Read more.

"We pledge to not waste water down the sink drain."
Anne Franzmann's 1st grade class at Birchwood Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation. Then, to celebrate Earth Day, they conducted a litter cleanup at Little Squalicum Beach. Over 40 pounds of trash was collected with help from the Bellingham Kiwanis Club and Congressman Rick Larsen - they even made the news! Read more.

"We pledge to reduce, reuse, and recycle!"
Susan Kelley's 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. With help from our friend Amberose at WSU Extension - Whatcom County, the 1st grade classrooms now have a functioning worm compost bin for all their leftover food scraps from snack time. During the process, students were able to hold and observe the worms and illustrate their new friends.

"We pledge to reduce, reuse, and recycle!"
Marla Reimer's 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. With help from our friend Amberose at WSU Extension - Whatcom County, the 1st grade classrooms now have a functioning worm compost bin for all their leftover food scraps from snack time. During the process, students were able to hold and observe the worms and illustrate their new friends.

"We pledge to compost our food waste for our garden."
Emily Hie's 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. With help from our friend Amberose at WSU Extension - Whatcom County, the 1st grade classrooms now have a functioning worm compost bin for all their leftover food scraps from snack time. During the process, students were able to hold and observe the worms and illustrate their new friends.


2nd Grade

"We pledge to use the lunchroom trash and compost correctly."
Kristy Tice's 2nd grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students created educational posters they could display to show others the danger of landfills and importance of practicing reduce, reuse, recycle, and compost.

"We pledge to use the lunchroom trash and compost correctly."
Allison Alexander's 2nd grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students created educational posters they could display to show others the danger of landfills and importance of practicing reduce, reuse, recycle, and compost.

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands with soap. This saves around 7 cups of water every time."
Leilani Hoch's 2nd grade class at Alderwood Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They conducted a water audit for their classroom sink, drinking fountain, and teacher lounge to estimate the amount of water used for various tasks around the school. Students then created posters and signs to help remind others to conserve water.

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands with soap. This saves around 7 cups of water every time."
Ana Mungarro's 2nd grade class at Alderwood Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation.

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands with soap. This saves around 7 cups of water every time."
Allison Muncie's 2nd grade class at Alderwood Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation.

"We pledge to use the lunchroom trash and compost correctly."
KC Rhodes' 2nd grade class at Irene Reither Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students created recycled paper shapes to learn the recycling process of paper.

"We pledge to pick up litter when it is safe to do so and place it in the correct recycling or garbage bin."
Ana Mungarro's 2nd grade class at Alderwood Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After learning about the environmental impacts of litter and landfills, and how we should practice "reduce, reuse, and recycle" to manage our waste, students were inspired to host a litter cleanup. After spending an afternoon outside around their school, students collected a total of 19 pounds of litter and an entire bike!

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands with soap. This saves around 7 cups of water every time."
Ana Mungarro's 2nd grade class at Alderwood Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. After learning how much energy is used to create new materials and even process recycled items, students made their own recycled paper shapes.

"We pledge to think before we throw and practice the 3 R's - reduce, reuse, and recycle."
Scarlett Ballard's 2nd grade class at Irene Reither Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students created recycled paper shapes to learn the recycling process of paper.

"We pledge to pick up litter and dispose of it correctly."
Sarah Updike's 2nd grade class at Irene Reither Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students created recycled paper shapes to learn the recycling process of paper.

"We pledge to share school supplies with others so we don't have to go buy new ones."
Becky Pederson's 2nd grade class at Irene Reither Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students created recycled paper shapes to learn the recycling process of paper.

"We pledge to pick up litter when we see it and not litter in the classroom or environment."
Kathy Lorson-Howell's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students created posters about how to manage waste and protect the environment. These posters were hung around the school to educate
others.

"We pledge to conserve water by turning off the faucet when we brush our teeth and suds our hands with soap."
Kirsten Zoba's 2nd grade class at Cascadia Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They created informational posters to demonstrate the importance of water and educate others about all the ways they learned to conserve water at school and at home. Posters were placed around the school for the remainder of the school year.

"We pledge to conserve water by turning off the faucet when we brush our teeth and suds our hands with soap."

Denise Guessford's 2nd grade class at Cascadia Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They created informational posters to demonstrate the importance of water and educate others about all the ways they learned to conserve water at school and at home. Posters were placed around the school for the remainder of the school year.

"We pledge to THINK before we THROW. Is there a way we can reduce, reuse, recycle, or compost instead?"
Julia Ritchie's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students conducted a litter cleanup around the school grounds to make it a cleaner and healthier place for everyone to enjoy.

"We pledge to compost in the lunchroom, reduce what we buy, reuse items when we can, and always recycling scrap paper."
Linda Young's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After discussing ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, all the students learned how paper is recycled and created their own recycled paper shapes for artwork.


3rd Grade

"We pledge to only fill water bottles with water when it is needed and will be used."
Liane Koester's 3rd grade class at Lowell Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They created posters for Bellingham's Walk for Water event in honor of World Water Day in addition to creation individual pledge droplets to remind them to practice water conservation at home.

"We pledge to practice water conservation: protect water from pollution and save water from being wasted."
Danielle Pike-McArdle's 3rd grade class at Alderwood Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They created posters for Bellingham's Walk for Water event in honor of World Water Day as well as creating posters to help other students around their school practice water conservation.

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands and brush our teeth."
Marca Kidwell-Babcock's 3rd grade class at Parkview Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After learning about the importance of water conservation, students helped decorate table cloths for the City of Bellingham's annual Walk for Water event, which celebrates UN World Water Day. In addition, students held a month-long competition to seek out the most water conscious classroom at Parkview. Students handed out water conservation tickets throughout the month of April, and awarded the classroom with the most tickets a golden water bottle during their monthly recognition assembly.

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands and brush our teeth."
Carrie Hewitt's 3rd grade class at Parkview Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After learning about the importance of water conservation, students helped decorate table cloths for the City of Bellingham's annual Walk for Water event, which celebrates UN World Water Day. In addition, students held a month-long competition to seek out the most water conscious classroom at Parkview. Students handed out water conservation tickets throughout the month of April, and awarded the classroom with the most tickets a golden water bottle during their monthly recognition assembly.

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands and pick up litter when we see it."
Isabel Machuca's 3rd grade class at Northern Heights Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. In order to practice conservation by protecting water from pollution, students conducted a litter cleanup around their school. Students collected litter as well as dog poop to protect Toad Creek, a creek that runs right next to the school and flows into Squalicum Creek where water quality is suffering.

"We pledge to not waste water while we are washing our hands at school."
Mimi Saunders' 3rd grade class at Northern Heights Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. In order to practice conservation by protecting water from pollution, students conducted a litter cleanup around their school. Students collected litter as well as dog poop to protect Toad Creek, a creek that runs right next to the school and flows into Squalicum Creek where water quality is suffering.

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when it is dripping or leaking so it's not wasted."
Rachel Frere's 3rd grade class at Northern Heights Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. In order to practice conservation by protecting water from pollution, students conducted a litter cleanup around their school. Students collected litter as well as dog poop to protect Toad Creek, a creek that runs right next to the school and flows into Squalicum Creek where water quality is suffering.


4th Grade

"We pledge to educate others about the importance of water, practice water conservation to save water from being wasted, and protect water from pollution and litter.
"
Mr Riley's 4th grade class at Blaine Elementary completed a waste prevention and water conservation project, with the help of the City of Blaine and Birch Bay Water and Sewer District. Every student competed in a grade-level-wide poster awareness competition to illustrate their pledge or practicing awareness, conservation, and taking action to save and protect our water resources. Mr. Riley had the 1st place winner, Max, who won a pizza party for his entire class.

"We pledge to educate others about the importance of water, practice water conservation to save water from being wasted, and protect water from pollution and litter."
Ms. Lawrance's 4th grade class at Blaine Elementary completed a waste prevention and water conservation project, with the help of the City of Blaine and Birch Bay Water and Sewer District. Every student competed in a grade-level-wide poster awareness competition to illustrate their pledge or practicing awareness, conservation, and taking action to save and protect our water resources. 

"We pledge to educate others about the importance of water, practice water conservation to save water from being wasted, and protect water from pollution and litter."
Mrs. Bennett's 4th grade class at Blaine Elementary completed a waste prevention and water conservation project, with the help of the City of Blaine and Birch Bay Water and Sewer District. Every student competed in a grade-level-wide poster awareness competition to illustrate their pledge or practicing awareness, conservation, and taking action to save and protect our water resources. 

"We pledge to educate others about the importance of water, practice water conservation to save water from being wasted, and protect water from pollution and litter."
Mrs. Schulz's 4th grade class at Blaine Elementary completed a waste prevention and water conservation project, with the help of the City of Blaine and Birch Bay Water and Sewer District. Every student competed in a grade-level-wide poster awareness competition to illustrate their pledge or practicing awareness, conservation, and taking action to save and protect our water resources.

"We pledge to educate others about the importance of water, practice water conservation to save water from being wasted, and protect water from pollution and litter."
Ms. Keiper's 4th grade class at Blaine Elementary completed a waste prevention and water conservation project, with the help of the City of Blaine and Birch Bay Water and Sewer District. Every student competed in a grade-level-wide poster awareness competition to illustrate their pledge or practicing awareness, conservation, and taking action to save and protect our water resources.

"We pledge to educate others about the importance of water, practice water conservation to save water from being wasted, and protect water from pollution and litter."
Mrs. Tennyson's 4th grade class at Blaine Elementary completed a waste prevention and water conservation project, with the help of the City of Blaine and Birch Bay Water and Sewer District. Every student competed in a grade-level-wide poster awareness competition to illustrate their pledge or practicing awareness, conservation, and taking action to save and protect our water resources.

"We pledge to practice multiple actions to do our part for water conservation, waste prevention, and energy efficiency."

Ms. Miller's 4th grade class at Irene Reither Elementary participated in all three of our green classroom workshops and completed a cumulative project. Students created posters to illustrate the importance of and ways to practice conservation. Students made posters about water, energy, waste and even all 3!

"We pledge to practice multiple actions to do our part for water conservation, waste prevention, and energy efficiency."
Mr. Shaffer's 4th grade class at Irene Reither Elementary participated in all three of our green classroom workshops and completed a cumulative project. Students learned more about the process of recycling and how it helps conserve both energy and water by creating their own recycled paper. Each student also created an individual pledge for water conservation.

"We pledge to practice multiple actions to do our part for water conservation, waste prevention, and energy efficiency."
Mrs. Moe's 4th grade class at Irene Reither Elementary participated in all three of our green classroom workshops and completed a cumulative project. Students created posters to illustrate the importance of and ways to practice conservation. Students made posters about water, energy, waste and even all 3!

"We pledge to practice multiple actions to do our part for water conservation, waste prevention, and energy efficiency."
Ms. Needham's 4th grade class at Irene Reither Elementary participated in all three of our green classroom workshops and completed a cumulative project. Students learned more about the process of recycling and how it helps conserve both energy and water by creating their own recycled paper. Each student also created an individual pledge for water conservation.

"We pledge to not waste hot water when we are washing our hands at school."
Ryan Mitchell's 4th grade class at Custer Elementary completed a Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They conducted an energy audit for their classroom to assess how much energy they are using on a daily, weekly, and yearly basis. Calculations from the audit were used to help identify ways in which they can continue to practice energy efficiency in the classroom.

"We pledge to always turn off the lights when we leave the classroom."
Brandi Capdeville's 4th grade class at Custer Elementary completed a Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They conducted an energy audit for their classroom to assess how much energy they are using on a daily, weekly, and yearly basis. Calculations from the audit were used to help identify ways in which they can continue to practice energy efficiency in the classroom.


5th grade

"We pledge to establish and maintain a Food to Flowers compost bucket in our classroom."
Mark Danielson's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency project. They conducted trail maintenance on the upper trail connected to their school - clearing the path and collecting litter created a more usable and pleasing green space for everyone to enjoy.

"We pledge to support efforts in mentoring younger students on how to use the landfill waste and Food to Flowers bin in the lunchroom."
Kerry Hermann's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency project. They conducted trail maintenance on the lower trail connected to their school - clearing the path and collecting litter created a more usable and pleasing green space for everyone to enjoy.

"We pledge to 'unplug' and play outside more this summer, using up our own personal energy rather than energy coming from fossil fuels."
Angela Haye's 5th grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency project. Students completed a classroom energy audit to assess how much energy they are using every year and what solutions may be best for energy conservation in their classroom.

"We pledge to 'unplug' and play outside more this summer, using up our own personal energy rather than energy coming from fossil fuels."
Nicholas Perigo's 5th grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency project. Students completed a classroom energy audit to assess how much energy they are using every year and what solutions may be best for energy conservation in their classroom.

"We pledge to bring more plants into the classroom in an effort to process the carbon dioxide we release through breathing."
Lara Stark's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency project. They took an unused garden bed outside of their classroom and transformed it into a usable reading and group discussion area for sunny days at school. Thank you Green Earth Technology for donating soil mix to fill and cover the barren area!

"We pledge to turn off the printer and active board when not in use and donate 4 unused laptops."
Tawni Eisenhart's 5th grade class at Northern Heights Elementary completed a Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They conducted an energy audit for their classroom to assess how much energy they are using on a daily, weekly, and yearly basis. Calculations from the audit were used to help identify ways in which they can continue to practice energy efficiency in the classroom.

"We pledge to pick up litter when we see it and dispose of it correctly."
Emily Jones' 5th grade class at Carl Cozier Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They conducted a litter cleanup around their school grounds, collected almost 20 pounds of trash and making the entire area a cleaner and healthier place for everyone.

"We pledge to only use 0-2 banks of lights a day and instead rely on natural lighting."
Staci Shrum's 5th grade class at Northern Heights Elementary completed a Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They conducted an energy audit for their classroom to assess how much energy they are using on a daily, weekly, and yearly basis. Calculations from the audit were used to help identify ways in which they can continue to practice energy efficiency in the classroom.

"We pledge to turn off our overhead lights and use natural lighting whenever possible."
Sheryl Binning's 5th grade class at Northern Heights Elementary completed a Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They conducted an energy audit for their classroom to assess how much energy they are using on a daily, weekly, and yearly basis. Calculations from the audit were used to help identify ways in which they can continue to practice energy efficiency in the classroom.


Multi-Grade Levels

"We pledge to compost leftover snack scraps in our new worm bin compost."
The after-school homework club at Meadows completed a Waste Prevention project. With help from our friends Beth and Amberose at WSU Extension - Whatcom County, the club now has a functioning worm compost bin for all their leftover food scraps from snack time. During the process, students were able to hold and observe the worms as well as wring out and fluff their new 'bedding'. We even found time to create colorful compostable food to decorate the new bin!

"We pledge to conserve water by using any extra or unwanted water to water our indoor plants."
Jesi Van Leeuwen's K-5th grade class at Bellingham Free Community School completed a Water Conservation project. After their workshop, students created information posters and signs for the City of Bellingham's annual Walk for Water event, which celebrates UN World Water Day.


Green Classroom Accomplishments 2014-2015

posted Nov 29, 2016, 3:29 PM by Virginia Cleaveland   [ updated Dec 5, 2016, 2:55 PM by RE Sources for Sustainable Communities ]

Congratulations to the following classrooms who attained their Green Classroom Certification in 2014-2015! See what amazing things these classes have accomplished below.

Our free Green Classroom program helps teachers integrate conservation education into curriculum and initiate positive action in the classroom. Through workshops, pledges, and action projects we challenge students to think critically about their use of natural resources and see how waste, water, and energy are integral parts of our everyday lives. Hands-on activities and projects provide them the opportunity to brainstorm solutions and take action to promote conservation.


1st Grade

"We pledge to bring waste-free or minimal waste lunches to school."
Meghan Trueman's 1st grade class at Hillcrest Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They created a chart to help them track their waste every day for the rest of the school year. After just 3 days. they were already seeing a decrease in the amount of landfill-bound waste there classroom generated.

"We pledge to continually reduce, reuse and recycle."
Susan Kelley's 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. With help from our friends Beth and Amberose at WSU Extension - Whatcom County, the 1st graders now have a functioning worm compost bin for all their leftover food scraps. During the process, students were able to hold and observe the worms as well as wring out and fluff their new 'bedding'. Read more.

"We pledge to continually reduce, reuse and recycle."
Kim Fredere's 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. With help from our friends Beth and Amberose at WSU Extension - Whatcom County, the 1st graders now have a functioning worm compost bin for all their leftover food scraps. During the process, students were able to hold and observe the worms as well as wring out and fluff their new 'bedding'. Read more.

"We pledge to continually reduce, reuse and recycle."
Michelle Brooks' 1st grade class at Kendall Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. With help from our friends Beth and Amberose at WSU Extension - Whatcom County, the 1st graders now have a functioning worm compost bin for all their leftover food scraps. During the process, students were able to hold and observe the worms as well as wring out and fluff their new 'bedding'. Read more.

"We pledge to pick up litter when we see it and put it in the correct recycling bin or trash can."
Annie Franzmann's 1st grade class at Birchwood Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They walked along the interurban trail to Squalicum Beach to pick up litter and complete an informal waste audit of what they found. All together, students collected almost 10 pounds of trash and left the public beach a much cleaner and healthier place for everyone.


2nd grade

"We pledge to only use 1 or 2 lights while we're in the classroom."
Tristy Nielsen's 2nd grade class at Hillcrest Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. First, they each created a "Turn Me Off" sticker to put near light switches as a quick reminder - see photo below. Then each student took the information they learned during the workshop to other classrooms and taught them about energy efficiency. Each classroom was then presented with a switch plate sticker.

"We pledge to continually reduce, reuse and recycle."
Julia Ritchie's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They brought a compost bin into their classroom so they could start composting their paper towels. Also, they went out and taught other students how to correctly sort recyclables.

"We pledge to continually reduce, reuse and recycle."
Kathy Lorson-Howell's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They brought a compost bin into their classroom so they could start composting their paper towels.

"We pledge to teach others how to recycle correctly."
Sharie Burdick's 2nd grade class at Silver Beach Elementary complete a Waste Prevention project. They created educational posters to post around their schools to encourage others to stop littering and start recycling waste.

"We pledge to continually reduce, reuse and recycle."
Linda Young's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They created a Reader's Theater script that they then read to the 1st graders. This script encouraged the other students to use the garbage and compost bins around the school correctly.

"We pledge to remember to recycle things that are recyclable."
Kristy Tice's 2nd grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed a Waste Prevention Project. After their workshop, they created educational posters to put up around their school to teach others of the dangers of landfills and the importance of living a "reduce, reuse, recycle" lifestyle.

"We pledge to correctly sort recycling and compost. Think before we throw and donate what we can."
Allison Alexander's 2nd grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After a focused lesson on composting, students created posters highlighting snack items that could and could not go into the compost bin. These posters were then displayed next to their new compost collection bin in the classroom.

"We pledge to practice the 3 R's every day."
Val Jones' 2nd grade class at Hillcrest Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. After participating in the classroom workshop, students went to other classrooms to spread their new-found knowledge on how to correctly recycle and reduce their additions to nasty landfills.


3rd Grade

"We pledge to waste less water every day."
Donna Smith's 3rd grade class at Hillcrest Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They took the information they learned during the workshop and taught another classroom about why water is so important and how we can each make choices to conserve water every day.

"We pledge to turn off the water while we scrub our hands."
Liane Koester's 3rd grade class at Lowell Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. After an additional Air Quality workshop, the students chose a research topic related to animals and environmental impacts to their habitat. The projects were then presented during the school's science fair. Way to go above and beyond!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJhPW8jojrLWcze8ChAy8wA
"We pledge to regularly conserve water in the classroom."
Marca Babcock's 3rd grade class at Parkview Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They created, videotaped, and presented skits about water conservation to other classrooms in their school in conjunction with Jill Cofer's 3rd grade class. This is Babcock and Cofer's second year receiving Green Classroom Certification - great job Parkview 3rd graders! Go to the Green Classroom Action Project page on YouTube to see them all.

"We pledge to regularly conserve water in the classroom."
Jill Cofer's 3rd grade class at Parkview Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They created PowerPoint presentations about water conservation to other classrooms in their school in conjunction with Marca Babcock's 3rd grade class. This is Cofer and Babcock's second year receiving Green Classroom Certification — great job Parkview 3rd graders! Click on any of the following presentations to see what they came up with: Eli, Giselle, Luke, and Wyatt.

"We pledge to practice Water Conservation at home."
Amy Roselli's 3rd grade class at Happy Valley Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After calculating their families daily water use, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind their families to practice water conservation.

"We pledge to practice Water Conservation at home."
Tara Aperule's 3rd grade class at Happy Valley Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After calculating their families daily water use, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind their families to practice water conservation.


4th Grade

"We pledge to turn off light sources when we leave the room."
Jodi Crimmin's 4th grade class at Hillcrest Elementary completed an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They took the information they learned during the workshop and taught another classroom about why energy efficiency is so important and how we can each make choices to conserve energy every day.

"We pledge to continually educate others about the importance of water conservation."
Julie Harrison's 4th grade class at Kendall Elementary complete a Water Conservation project. They created educational posters highlighting the importance of water and how everyone can make choices every day to keep water clean and abundant.

"We pledge to recycle paper, plastic bags, and empty glue stick containers."
Debbie Bryner's 4th grade class at Hillcrest Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They set up multiple stations around their school to collect empty glue stick containers that will be taken and recycled at Walmart as part of the Elmer's Glue Crew program.

"We pledge to continually educate others about the importance of water conservation."
Bette Mitchell's 4th grade class at Kendall Elementary complete a Water Conservation project. They created educational posters highlighting the importance of water and how everyone can make choices every day to keep water clean and abundant.

"We pledge to continually educate others about the importance of water conservation."
Justine Munoz's 4th grade class at Kendall Elementary complete a Water Conservation project. They created educational posters highlighting the importance of water and how everyone can make choices every day to keep water clean and abundant.

"We pledge to A.C.T. - Practice Awareness and Conservation while Taking Action to keep our drinking water source clean and abundant."
Several classes at Blaine Elementary completed a Waste Prevention and Water Conservation project, made possible with the help of Birch Bay Water and Sewer and the City of Blaine. After their workshop, students competed in a grade-wide Water Awareness Poster Competition. Students were asked to illustrate an Underground Water Warrior and demonstrate what they learned about waste prevention and water conservation. The winner received a pizza party for their classroom! Classrooms included:
  • Ms. Keiper's 4th grade class
  • Mr. Maxim's 4th grade class
  • Mrs. Schulz's 4th grade class
  • Mr. Dickson's 4th grade class
  • Mrs. Tennyson's 4th grade class
  • Mr. Jensen's 4th grade class
  • Mrs. Nowakowski's 4th grade class 


5th grade

"We pledge to rescue lost pencils and compost paper towels."
Mark Danielson's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. In honor of Earth day, students pulled invasive ivy along a school trail. Their project was such a big hit, the school district wrote an article highlighting their work! Read more.

"We pledge to use white boards instead of scratch paper and compost paper towels in the classroom."
Lara Stark's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. In honor of Earth day, students picked up litter around the school grounds. Their project was such a big hit, the school district wrote an article highlighting their work! Read more.

"We pledge to practice Water Conservation at home."
Angela Williams' 5th grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation.

"We pledge to practice Water Conservation at home."
Angie Hayes' 5th grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation.


Multi-Grade Levels

"We pledge to reduce, reuse, and recycle every day."
Jesi Van Leeuwen's K-5th grade class at Bellingham Free Community School completed a Waste Prevention project. After their workshop, students created Mother's Day cards out of recycled paper. Since making those, students have continued to collect all their colored paper and make recycled paper for projects!

"We pledge to turn off the faucet when we scrub our hands and brush our teeth."
Catie Holcroft's after-school homework club at Sterling Meadows completed a Water Conservation project. After learning about how much water is wasted every day, students created posters illustrating the many plants and animals that depend on fresh, clean water to survive and highlighted tips to save water. Each poster was hung in the bathroom of their community room.

"We pledge to re-use and re-purpose items whenever we can."
Terri Cook's K-2nd grade class at Beach Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They did paper-making with a purpose, creating 100% recycled paper valentines to pass out to friends and families. They also hope to start up their school garden again this year and use their compost pile more efficiently.

"We pledge to re-use and re-purpose items whenever we can."
Judy Thomas' 3rd-5th grade class at Beach Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They did paper-making with a purpose, creating 100% recycled paper valentines to pass out to friends and families. They also hope to start up their school garden again this year and use their compost pile more efficiently.

"We pledge to practice Water Conservation at home."
Nick Perigo's 4th/5th grade class at Silver Beach Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. After discussing daily water use at home, they created individualized pledge droplets to place in their bathrooms or kitchens to remind themselves and their families to practice water conservation.

Green Classroom Accomplishments 2013-2014

posted Nov 29, 2016, 3:00 PM by Virginia Cleaveland   [ updated Nov 29, 2016, 3:02 PM ]

Congratulations to the following classrooms who attained their Green Classroom Certification in 2013-2014! See what amazing things these classes have accomplished below.

Our free Green Classroom program helps teachers integrate conservation education into curriculum and initiate positive action in the classroom. Through workshops, pledges, and action projects we challenge students to think critically about their use of natural resources and see how waste, water, and energy are integral parts of our everyday lives. Hands-on activities and projects provide them the opportunity to brainstorm solutions and take action to promote conservation.


Kindergarten

"We pledge to start composting more consistently in the classroom."
Susan Davis' Kindergarten class at Columbia Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They made posters about ways to “reduce, reuse, and recycle” and shared their learning with other classrooms.


1st Grade

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8UlEZszpxM&feature=youtu.be
"We pledge to start composting in the classroom."
Doss Herndon-Schepper's 1st grade class at Carl Cozier Elementary participated in a Waste Prevention project. They produced and shared a campaign video that talked about composting in the classroom. The goal was to teach others about composting and recruit other classrooms to join them in their class pledge. Click on the video below to watch.

"We pledge to turn off the water when we brush our teeth and wash our hands."
Franzmann's 1st Grade class at Cordata Elementary completed an educational Water Conservation project. They hung up posters around there school promoting the sustainable consumption and use of water.

"We pledge to turn off the water while we are soaping our hands."
Per Junkerman's 1st grade class at Carl Cozier Elementary completed a Water Conservation project. They sent appeals to the school PTA for help with installing a school rain barrel and managed to get one installed in the school garden. They now water the garden themselves three times a week with the water collected from the rain barrel.

"We pledge to use less lighting and unplug electronics when not in use."
Kelly Morgan's 1st grade class at Cordata Elementary created an educational Energy Efficiency and Climate Change campaign. They brainstormed ways to reduce power use and “unplug” during the summer. They put up posters in the hallways to share their strategies with others.

"We pledge to turn off the water while we are soaping our hands."
Rachel Smith's 1st grade class at Cordata Elementary created a Water Conservation project. They made “reminder cups” to place next to their sinks at home to help them be more mindful of their water use and remember all the different ways to reduce their consumption.


2nd Grade

"We pledge to turn off the lights and computers when they aren't in the room."
Elise Mueller's 2nd grade class at Carl Cozier Elementary started an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change challenge for their school. They became Power Rangers and carried their pledge out to the rest of the building. Whenever they see lights or electronics on that are not in use, they turn them off.

"We pledge to take better care of our classroom school supplies."
Lisa Conlon's 2nd grade class at Carl Cozier Elementary completed a Waste Prevention project. They collected data about pencils and erasers found in classrooms around the school to see how well students were taking care of supplies, how this relates to the amount of waste produced, and how the demand for new supplies uses up valuable resources. See more.

"We pledge to start recycling paper and composting food scraps."
Linda Young's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary created an educational Waste Prevention campaign. They posted posters around their school encouraging sustainable practices and waste reduction.

"We pledge to start composting in the classroom."
Julia Ritchie's 2nd grade class at Geneva Elementary created an educational Waste Prevention campaign. They created posters about composting in the classroom, trying to get other classrooms to join them in their pledge.

"We pledge to Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!"
Kathy Lorson-Howell's 2nd Grade class at Geneva participated in a Waste Reduction project. They created posters in honor of Earth Day that encouraged waste reduction and hung them around the school.


3rd Grade

"We pledge to turn off the water while we are soaping our hands."
Joyce Sweeney's 3rd grade class at Columbia Elementary created an educational Water Conservation campaign. They made posters to hang in the hallways and bathrooms and went into other classrooms to talk about the importance of remembering to turn off the faucet when you’re done washing your hands.

"We pledge to turn off the water while we are soaping our hands and when we are done washing them."
Marca Babcock's 3rd grade class at Parkview Elementary created an educational Water Conservation campaign. They made posters about the importance of their pledge and posted them around the school, particularly near bathrooms.

"We pledge to turn off the water while we are soaping our hands and when we are done washing them."
Jill Cofer's 3rd grade class at Parkview Elementary created an educational Water Conservation campaign. They made posters about the importance of their pledge and posted them around the school, particularly near bathrooms.

"We pledge to turn the water off while we are soaping our hands."
Alasia Canares' 3rd grade class at Carl Cozier Elementary created a Water Conservation project. They held a poster contest to pick the best posters for sharing what they learned. They then put the winning posters up around the school to spread awareness of ways to conserve water.






4th grade

"We pledge to turn off the water while we are soaping our hands"
Becky Wiederhold' s 4th/5th grade class at Columbia Elementary participated in a Water Conservation project. They labeled stormwater drains in the Columbia neighborhood.

"We Pledge to turn off lights when not in use and turn off all electronics at the end of the day."
Ben Scherrer's 4th grade class at Carl Cozier Elementary participated in an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They participated in an Earth Day litter pick up and waste audit for the general area surrounding the school. This project made the news! You can see the Herald article HERE!

"We pledge to use less lighting and turn off electronics when not in use."
Joe Anderson's 4th grade class at Wade King Elementary explored an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change topic. They conducted research projects related to their focus area and shared their findings with other classes.

"We pledge to turn off lights and gadgets when they’re not in use."
Todd Denton's 4th grade class at Wade King Elementary explored an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change topic. They conducted research projects related to their focus area and shared their findings with other classes.

"We pledge to turn off the water while we are soaping our hands."
Shannon Sampson's 4th/5th grade class at Columbia Elementary participated in a Water Conservation project. They labeled stormwater drains in the Columbia neighborhood.

"We pledge to turn off lights and gadgets when they’re not in use."
Tiffany Gutierrez' 4th grade class at Wade King Elementary explored an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change topic. They conducted research projects related to their focus area and shared their findings with other classes.


5th Grade

"We pledge to pay more attention to the bins in the lunchroom and to use them correctly."
Laura Britt's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary participated in an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They planted native species trees on school property to encourage the restoration of local habitat and wildlife.

"We pledge to start composting in the classroom."
Lara Stark's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary participated in an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They planted native species trees on school property to encourage the restoration of local habitat and wildlife.

"We pledge to pay more attention to the bins in the lunchroom and to use them correctly."
Mark Danielson's 5th grade class at Geneva Elementary participated in an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change project. They planted native species trees on school property to encourage the restoration of local habitat and wildlife.

"We pledge to turn off lights when they’re not in use."
Nate Cornelson's 5th grade class at Wade King Elementary started an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change campaign. They did an educational campaign about the differences between conventional and CFL bulbs and explained the benefits of CFLs.

"We pledge to decrease paper waste by using more scrap paper."
Gretchen Howard's 5th grade class at Wade King Elementary created an Energy Efficiency and Climate Change campaign. They did an educational campaign about the differences between conventional and CFL bulbs and the benefits of CFLs.

"We pledge to turn off the computers in the hallway at the end of the school day."
Molly Foote's 5th grade class at Wade King Elementary created a school-wide Energy Efficiency and Climate Change program. They assumed responsibility of taking out all of the school’s recycling to observe how much recyclable material the school actually produced, as well as what could be recycled.


1-9 of 9